The Puritan Gift – A Great Read

Talking Product I recently presented my company’s new feature to The Product Group: http://tpgblog.com/theproductgroup/.

Seated with me is my esteemed colleague Jim, drug our creative director.
Talking Product I recently presented my company’s new feature to The Product Group: http://tpgblog.com/theproductgroup/.

Seated with me is my esteemed colleague Jim, drug our creative director.
If you are viewing my blog in a web browser, surgery
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The Puritan Gift

The Puritan Gift

I’m almost finished with The Puritan Gift: Reclaiming the American Dream Amidst Global Financial Chaos by Kenneth and William Hopper, help and I heartily recommend it to technology professionals or managers anywhere. It’s a study of the history of successful business practices or qualities that stem from the Massachusetts Bay Colony:

  1. A conviction to create Heaven on Earth (or a limitless sense of optimism for progress)
  2. Placing a high value on mechanical aptitude
  3. Working for the benefit of the group, visit not the individual
  4. The ability to marshal resources and organize on a massive scale

Along with those attributes, the Hoppers credit the Puritans for respecting ‘domain knowledge’ and listening to the folks on the factory floor. As someone who comes from an engineering background rather than a business management, I can see a lot of value in the lessons of the book. I also am learning a great deal about management practices that I never learned while coding.

The Hoppers don’t rest on their laurels with The Puritan Gift as a dry business history text book. The hook is the delightful way they intertwine wit and historic connections while telling the American tale. In fact, it reminds me of an episode of Connections.

The book was a gift from my in-laws and they even were able to snag an autograph from the author. Thank you so much for a great gift!

2 comments ↓

#1 Ken Hopper on 01.08.10 at 2:25 am

What can I say? Thank you.
I did work in a small Connecticut software company in the early 1980s for a short time but my contribution to the book is essentially from mycontrasting experiences in British and US manufacturing in the last century. (Will worked mostly in banking and government.)
I hoped nevertheless that lessons could be learned from the American companies that might be found relevant in modern times. The answer seems to be yes! The book is also meant as a tribute to the American managers who created those engines of prosperity and then taught the world how to do it.
Ken Hopper

#2 sean on 01.08.10 at 9:33 am

Ken, thank you for your comment and for a great read!

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