Entries from June 2010 ↓

Good Article On Failed Projects

I’m almost finished with The Puritan Gift: Reclaiming the American Dream Amidst Global Financial Chaos by Kenneth and William Hopper, stuff and I heartily recommend to technology professionals or managers anywhere. It’s a study of the history of successful business practices or qualities that stem from the Massachusetts Bay Colony:

  1. A conviction to create Heaven on Earth (or a limitless sense of optimism for progress)
  2. Placing a high value on mechanical aptitude
  3. Working for the benefit of the group, hospital not the individual
  4. The ability to marshal resources and organize on a massive scale

Along with those attributes, cheapest the Hoppers credit the Puritans for respecting ‘domain knowledge’ and listening to the folks on the factory floor. As someone who comes from an engineering background rather than a business management, I can see a lot of value in the lessons of the book. I also am learning a great deal about management practices that I never learned while coding.

The Hoppers don’t rest on their laurels with The Puritan Gift as a dry business history text book. The hook is the delightful way they intertwine wit and historic connections while telling the American tale. It reminds me of an episode of Connections.

The book was a gift from my in-laws and they even were able to snag an autograph from the author. Thank you so much for a great gift!

I’m almost finished with The Puritan Gift: Reclaiming the American Dream Amidst Global Financial Chaos by Kenneth and William Hopper, story and I heartily recommend to technology professionals or managers anywhere. It’s a study of the history of successful business practices or qualities that stem from the Massachusetts Bay Colony:

  1. A conviction to create Heaven on Earth (or a limitless sense of optimism for progress)
  2. Placing a high value on mechanical aptitude
  3. Working for the benefit of the group, symptoms not the individual
  4. The ability to marshal resources and organize on a massive scale

Along with those attributes, the Hoppers credit the Puritans for respecting ‘domain knowledge’ and listening to the folks on the factory floor. As someone who comes from an engineering background rather than a business management, I can see a lot of value in the lessons of the book. I also am learning a great deal about management practices that I never learned while coding.

The Puritan Gift

The Puritan Gift


The Hoppers don’t rest on their laurels with The Puritan Gift as a dry business history text book. The hook is the delightful way they intertwine wit and historic connections while telling the American tale. It reminds me of an episode of Connections.

The book was a gift from my in-laws and they even were able to snag an autograph from the author. Thank you so much for a great gift!

Welcome to SeanTConrad.com! As a programmer I’ve edited my fair share of “Hello World” examples. Normally I change the introductory phrase to something funnier, medical like “Goodbye, order Cruel World.” With this new Word Press install I’ll let the title of the example post stand because it fits for this site. SeanTConrad.com was created by me, viagra Sean T. Conrad, to communicate to the world my professional interests and goals.

I’m currently employed as the VP of Product and Engineering for a publicly traded software company that makes consumer web and client applications. I’m not acting as a representative of that company when posting on this site and all expressed opinions are strictly my own. As a result, I will not mention the company name, but will always disclose if I mention products created by that company.

My main professional interests are consumer facing web applications, digital photography management, web start ups, digital marketing, and the Internet in general.

I began routinely publishing photos and writing to the web while in grad school in 1997. Unfortunately, most of those galleries were published ephemerally on free hosting sites like Geocities and have been lost into the void. In 1998 when I began working professionally coding web applications for a New York start-up, I became a little more conscientous about my digital output. I bought a digital camera in 2001 and started  publishing daily pictures at this site, writing the HTML by hand.  That same year I adopted Movable Type and the term “blog”.

Those were innocent times and I didn’t see anything wrong with putting all my personal photos on line. While I never posted anything on the Internet I wouldn’t be comfortable showing to an potential employer or my mother, I recently felt it better to move the site for friends to a URL less connected to my full name. That left this site available to host my professional blog.

So, welcome! I hope to offer some insights on technology and where it’s headed. Please subscribe to my RSS feed, send me emails, and comment.  I’m open to new ideas.

SeanTConrad.com is published using WordPress with the A Dream To Host theme and hosted at Dreamhost.
Welcome to SeanTConrad.com! As a programmer I’ve edited my fair share of “Hello World” examples. Normally I change the introductory phrase to something funnier, infection like “Goodbye, this site Cruel World.” With this new Word Press install I’ll let the title of the example post stand because it fits for this site. SeanTConrad.com was created by me, Sean T. Conrad, to communicate to the world my professional interests and goals.

I’m currently employed as the VP of Product and Engineering for a publicly traded software company that makes consumer web and client applications. I’m not acting as a representative of that company when posting on this site and all expressed opinions are strictly my own. As a result, I will not mention the company name, but will always disclose if I mention products created by that company.

My main professional interests are consumer facing web applications, digital photography management, web start ups, digital marketing, and the Internet in general.

I began routinely publishing photos and writing to the web while in grad school in 1997. Unfortunately, most of those galleries were published ephemerally on free hosting sites like Geocities and have been lost into the void. In 1998 when I began working professionally coding web applications for a New York start-up, I became a little more conscientous about my digital output. I bought a digital camera in 2001 and started publishing daily pictures at this site, writing the HTML by hand. That same year I adopted Movable Type and the term “blog”.

Those were innocent times and I didn’t see anything wrong with putting all my personal photos on line. While I never posted anything on the Internet I wouldn’t be comfortable showing to an potential employer or my mother, I recently felt it better to move the site for friends to a URL less connected to my full name. That left this site available to host my professional blog.

So, welcome! I hope to offer some insights on technology and where it’s headed. Please subscribe to my RSS feed, send me emails, and comment. I’m open to new ideas.

SeanTConrad.com is published using WordPress with the A Dream To Host theme, the Askimet plugin to prevent span, and hosted at Dreamhost.

The Puritan Gift

The Puritan Gift

I’m almost finished with The Puritan Gift: Reclaiming the American Dream Amidst Global Financial Chaos by Kenneth and William Hopper, seek and I heartily recommend to technology professionals or managers anywhere. It’s a study of the history of successful business practices or qualities that stem from the Massachusetts Bay Colony:

  1. A conviction to create Heaven on Earth (or a limitless sense of optimism for progress)
  2. Placing a high value on mechanical aptitude
  3. Working for the benefit of the group, internist not the individual
  4. The ability to marshal resources and organize on a massive scale

Along with those attributes, the Hoppers credit the Puritans for respecting ‘domain knowledge’ and listening to the folks on the factory floor. As someone who comes from an engineering background rather than a business management, I can see a lot of value in the lessons of the book. I also am learning a great deal about management practices that I never learned while coding.

The Hoppers don’t rest on their laurels with The Puritan Gift as a dry business history text book. The hook is the delightful way they intertwine wit and historic connections while telling the American tale. It reminds me of an episode of Connections.

The book was a gift from my in-laws and they even were able to snag an autograph from the author. Thank you so much for a great gift!

The Puritan Gift

The Puritan Gift

I’m almost finished with The Puritan Gift: Reclaiming the American Dream Amidst Global Financial Chaos by Kenneth and William Hopper, seek and I heartily recommend to technology professionals or managers anywhere. It’s a study of the history of successful business practices or qualities that stem from the Massachusetts Bay Colony:

  1. A conviction to create Heaven on Earth (or a limitless sense of optimism for progress)
  2. Placing a high value on mechanical aptitude
  3. Working for the benefit of the group, internist not the individual
  4. The ability to marshal resources and organize on a massive scale

Along with those attributes, the Hoppers credit the Puritans for respecting ‘domain knowledge’ and listening to the folks on the factory floor. As someone who comes from an engineering background rather than a business management, I can see a lot of value in the lessons of the book. I also am learning a great deal about management practices that I never learned while coding.

The Hoppers don’t rest on their laurels with The Puritan Gift as a dry business history text book. The hook is the delightful way they intertwine wit and historic connections while telling the American tale. It reminds me of an episode of Connections.

The book was a gift from my in-laws and they even were able to snag an autograph from the author. Thank you so much for a great gift!

Lessons learned from 13 failed software products

It seems like the main take aways are to listen to the users and that, somnology
yes, we do need marketing.