Entries Tagged 'Internet Companies' ↓

Talking Product

I haven’t posted in a while, pfizer look but I have been dabbling in a bunch of new technologies both at work and personally. My brother and sister-in-law have been writing original recipes and taking lots of beautiful photos, so I helped them set up a blog: FoodieLawyer.com. It’s a real pleasure to work with people who already have tons of great ideas, enthusiasm, and most importantly, tons of quality original content.

After trying our Tumbler, Blogger, WordPress.com, and Typepad, we went with WordPress hosted at Dreamhost. That option provides them with automatic security updates, but also allows custom plugins and flexibility. To get them started, I added a custom theme, Google Analytics, Google Website Tools, SEO optimization, Feedburner, a Facebook widget, Askimet comment spam prevention, Google AdSense for Content, Amazon affiliate program, and a nice plugin for integrating Picasa photos and albums. To be honest, because of so many available tools, it only took one line of custom CSS and two lines of PHP to get them going with a feature rich site. Well, it also takes tons and tons of content production by them, but at least they aren’t bogged down with the How.
I haven’t posted in a while, ask but I have been dabbling in a bunch of new technologies both at work and personally. My brother and sister-in-law have been writing original recipes and taking lots of beautiful photos, so I helped them set up a blog: FoodieLawyer.com. It’s a real pleasure to work with people who already have tons of great ideas, enthusiasm, and most importantly, tons of quality original content.

After trying our Tumbler, Blogger, WordPress.com, and Typepad, we went with WordPress hosted at Dreamhost. That option provides them with automatic security updates, but also allows custom plugins and flexibility. To get them started, I added a custom theme, Google Analytics, Google Website Tools, SEO optimization, Feedburner, a Facebook widget, Askimet comment spam prevention, Google AdSense for Content, Amazon affiliate program, and a nice plugin for integrating Picasa photos and albums. To be honest, because of so many available tools, it only took one line of custom CSS and two lines of PHP to get them going with a feature rich site. Well, it also takes tons and tons of content production by them, but at least they are
I haven’t posted in a while, ask but I have been dabbling in a bunch of new technologies both at work and personally. My brother and sister-in-law have been writing original recipes and taking lots of beautiful photos, so I helped them set up a blog: FoodieLawyer.com. It’s a real pleasure to work with people who already have tons of great ideas, enthusiasm, and most importantly, tons of quality original content.

After trying our Tumbler, Blogger, WordPress.com, and Typepad, we went with WordPress hosted at Dreamhost. That option provides them with automatic security updates, but also allows custom plugins and flexibility. To get them started, I added a custom theme, Google Analytics, Google Website Tools, SEO optimization, Feedburner, a Facebook widget, Askimet comment spam prevention, Google AdSense for Content, Amazon affiliate program, and a nice plugin for integrating Picasa photos and albums. To be honest, because of so many available tools, it only took one line of custom CSS and two lines of PHP to get them going with a feature rich site. Well, it also takes tons and tons of content production by them, but at least they are
If you are viewing my blog in a web browser, site
it looks completely normal. However, physiotherapy
if you are a search engine spider, all the text has been changed to be about various prescription drugs that you can buy online. My WordPress blog has been hacked. To fix this, I need to reinstall WordPress. If I have to waste a few hours, I will be switching blog software. Stay tuned.
Talking Product I recently presented my company’s new feature to The Product Group: http://tpgblog.com/theproductgroup/.

Seated with me is my esteemed colleague Jim, oncology our creative director.

Flickr, Python, Google, Open Source, and More!

I’ve spent a lot of time lately experimenting with different workflows for “prosumer” photo management. Since I adiposity cialis photos, photos!” href=”http://www.seantconrad.com/blog/2008/12/03/i-want-a-new-digital-photo-management-system/”>last wrote on the topic, I’ve bought into Flickr, buying a one year “Pro” membership. This entitles me to unlimited storage, so I want to upload my entire 60+ gigabytes of photos. However, almost immediately I’ve run into problems. Neither the Flick Uploader or the freeware FlickrSync work properly. The latter continues to produce duplicates on the Flickr server for me.

Another problem I’ve had to conquer is how to share my photos once they are at Flickr. I’d rather have them integrated with my personal site than send visitors to Flickr. For $25 a year, I feel I have the right to distribute my own photos. The Flickr license supports this, as long as there is a link to the original on Flickr.

To solve these problem and as part of my Sisyphean task to create the ideal and effortless, yet easy, way to share photos, I’ve dusted off my programming fingers and started banging out some code. I’ve got two efforts working:

1.) I’m trying to contribute to the Drupal Flickr Module. Drupal is an open source CMS that I use to publish my personal site. I’ve tweaked their Flickr module to easily publish individual or photo sets from Flickr to my site. I’ve offered my code to that team, so I hope it’s soon easy for all Drupal users to do the same. A WordPress module would also be easy to create.

2.) I just started a project at http://code.google.com called FlickrOCD. Currently, I’m only at the “Hello World” phase with Python, but I had switched a New Year’s resolution to learn Spanish to learn a new computer language instead. That should free up some time.

Whether or not I can complete these projects, I’m enjoying learning more about the Drupal CMS ,the Google App Engine, MVC, and GQL. It helps me manage developer teams when I am familiar with multiple technologies so that I can steer the team to the architecture most appropriate for our goals.

Someday, when a friend or relative asks, “How should I manage my photos?” I hope to send them to a complete guide here at STC.com.

Twitter Hype About To Reach Critical Mass…

I added some new links to the menu on the right showing that this site has validated HTML & CSS.  The free validation utilities linked from the invaluable Firefox Web Developers Toolbar are  a great way to inexpensively and quickly sanity check your website when full breadth QA is not feasible.
Or maybe even, ampoule “Who are we?” I’ve been thinking a lot lately about my online presence. When I first started establishing an online presence it was through a hand written blog and then via Movable Type on a domain that was my complete name. Mostly I posted pictures of my friends and I hanging out. The Facebook generation (which I am older than) is now learning what should be obvious, otolaryngologist don’t put anything on the Internet you don’t want the world to see.  While nothing I posted was against the law or damaging, I didn’t want pictures of me bleary eyed raising a toast to be too accessible to potential employers, yet they all were attached to my name. So recently I moved all the personal content to a URL of a pseudo name and started posting tech content here.  If I’m committed to keeping both sites up to date (and I am), this is a lot of work. It also has given me a bit of a split personality and I’m starting to regret it.

So I have two types of content create on the Internet: personal and professional.  What’s the best way to separate the two? Also, how do you not bore the respective audience with bits meant for the other? Also, how can it be easy?

The easiest way to do this might have been to have a professional blog and put all the friend stuff in a walled garden like Facebook.  That solution was not viable for me. Over the years my personal site has grown into an extensive hobby and moving it to a homogenized site like Facebook would ruin the fun. I’ve used Movable Type and then Drupal for years to create content and a look not exactly like anywhere else. I want to continue that. I’m also afraid to commit too much to Facebook because I remember how easily Friendster disappeared.

My divided identity solution can be taken even further than two sites. I use the Internet to share posts, videos, pictures, and short messages (tweets). Do I separate all those media across professional and personal lines? I could end up with two Flickr, Vimeo, and Twitter accounts. At some point it all gets ridiculous and I wonder if I am being productive or just falling down a new media OCD hole.

So how does one manage a professional and personal persona online? For most people I would recommend the walled garden. For a lot of people it’s easy because they don’t want to have both or even one persona online and would rather do old fashioned things like see operas or have dinners.

Here are my options:

– Give up on having a professional persona online. – There’s already too many “new media” bloggers, but that’s not my true goal (despite having actually written a post on Twitter). I want to present a portfolio of product ideas, process, and actual applications at this URL, which I believe is beneficial to my career.

– Move my personal content to Facebook or Flickr. – Ugh, that would take a year. It also would kill one of my main hobbies.

– Collapse the identities and the sites and let the audience just deal. – I’m tentatively still committed to separating the two. Along with creating the messages, I do enjoy playing with the media. I don’t think one format can support the two.

This leaves me about where I started when I began typing this conundrum. Going forward I’m going to update this site as a way to share technology information and highlight my work and ideas. Simultaneously I will continue my struggle to come up with the ultimate system for sharing photos, galleries, and posts to multiple blogs on my personal site.

I’m testing a very interesting piece of software called Sweetcron for this site. For my personal site, I’m sticking with Drupal for now, but I might just build a proprietary solution. For all of this, we…er, I mean I, will need some more coffee.
…which means the anti-Twitter backlash will soon follow.

I tried to explain Twitter a few posts ago. This video from Channel 7 in Chicago does the same and has screen shots of my friend Rachelle’s Twitter page.

Like me, diagnosis noted blogger and cartoonist Hugh MacLeod has joined, quit, and then re-joined Twitter. Unlike me, he has over a thousand followers.